Mucispirillum schaedleri Antagonizes Salmonella Virulence to Protect Mice against Colitis.

Herp S, Brugiroux S, Garzetti D, Ring D, Jochum LM, Beutler M, Eberl C, Hussain S, Walter S, Gerlach RG, Ruscheweyh HJ, Huson D, Sellin ME, Slack E, Hanson B, Loy A, Baines JF, Rausch P, Basic M, Bleich A, Berry D, Stecher B

Cell Host Microbe 25 (5) 681-694.e8 [2019-05-08; online 2019-04-18]

The microbiota and the gastrointestinal mucus layer play a pivotal role in protection against non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm) colitis. Here, we analyzed the course of Salmonella colitis in mice lacking a functional mucus layer in the gut. Unexpectedly, in contrast to mucus-proficient littermates, genetically deficient mice were protected against Salmonella-induced gut inflammation in the streptomycin colitis model. This correlated with microbiota alterations and enrichment of the bacterial phylum Deferribacteres. Using gnotobiotic mice associated with defined bacterial consortia, we causally linked Mucispirillum schaedleri, currently the sole known representative of Deferribacteres present in the mammalian microbiota, to host protection against S. Tm colitis. Inhibition by M. schaedleri involves interference with S. Tm invasion gene expression, partly by competing for anaerobic electron acceptors. In conclusion, this study establishes M. schaedleri, a core member of the murine gut microbiota, as a key antagonist of S. Tm virulence in the gut.

Fellows programme

Mikael Sellin

PubMed 31006637

DOI 10.1016/j.chom.2019.03.004

Crossref 10.1016/j.chom.2019.03.004

pii: S1931-3128(19)30156-8


Publications 7.1.2