Soluble TNF receptors and kidney dysfunction in the elderly.

Carlsson AC, Larsson TE, Helmersson-Karlqvist J, Larsson A, Lind L, Ärnlöv J

J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 25 (6) 1313-1320 [2014-06-00; online 2014-02-07]

The importance of TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) in the development of kidney disease is being unraveled. Yet, community-based data regarding the role of sTNFRs are lacking. We assessed serum sTNFRs and aspects of kidney damage cross-sectionally in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly participants: Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (n=815; mean age, 75 years; 51% women) and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n=778; mean age, 78 years). Serum sTNFR1 correlated substantially with different aspects of kidney pathology in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort (R=-0.52 for estimated GFR, R=0.22 for urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and R=0.17 for urinary kidney injury molecule-1; P<0.001 for all), with similar correlations in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort. These associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, inflammatory markers, and cardiovascular risk factors and were also evident in participants without diabetes. Serum sTNFR2 was associated with all three markers in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort (P<0.001 for all). Our findings from two independent community-based cohorts confirm and extend results of previous studies supporting circulating sTNFRs as relevant biomarkers for kidney damage and dysfunction in elderly individuals, even in the absence of diabetes.

Affiliated researcher

PubMed 24511129

DOI 10.1681/ASN.2013080860

Crossref 10.1681/ASN.2013080860

pii: ASN.2013080860
pmc: PMC4033380